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Campus Compact > Initiatives > Earn, Learn, and Serve: Getting the Most from Community Service Federal Work-Study

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Earn, Learn, and Serve: Getting the Most from Community Service Federal Work-Study

Until now, the only widely available writing on this topic included scattered articles and resources posted on the web, and a handbook produced annually by the Department of Education for Student Aid. This online resource from Campus Compact provides a thorough overview of community service Federal Work-Study.

 

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. A Brief History of the Federal Work-Study Program
  3. Principles of Good Practice in Community Service FWS
    1. Integrate community service Federal Work-Study
    2. Create program goals
    3. Formalize a structured institutional system
    4. Offer a range of community service positions
    5. Actively and effectively market community service opportunities
    6. Ensure that students receive a thorough orientation
    7. Contribute to student success
    8. Create partnerships
    9. Prepare community partner supervisors
    10. Adhere to the spirit and rules
  4. Developmental Matrix
    A tool to assist in planning for future development of FWS programs. Erin Bowley
     
  5. Partnering with Financial Aid Erin Bowley
    1. Introduction and Approach
    2. Key Concepts
    3. Building a Successful Relationship
    4. Other Typical Questions and Areas of Concern
  6. Community Service Federal Work-Study: The Best-Kept Secret in Higher Education?
    A commentary that includes benefits, data, and trends in community service FWS, as well as common concerns and solutions. Robert Davidson
     
  7. State Compact FWS Work
    1. California College of the Arts
    2. CSU Fresno
    3. Glendale Community College
    4. Stanford University
    5. University of Redlands
    6. University of San Diego
    7. Keene State College
    8. New Hampshire Technical Institute
    9. Southern New Hampshire University
    10. University of New Hampshire’“Manchester
  8. Campus Models
    1. Retention and Collaboration: IUPUI’s Office of Community Work-Study
    2. Faith-based Service: FWS at Azusa Pacific University
    3. Financial Aid Professionals at the Center: Colorado College’s FWS Progam
    4. Service in a Rural Setting: Meaningful Programs at Kirtland Community College District
    5. “We Can Do More!”: Campus-Community Collaboration at the University of South Florida
    6. Program Development through Evaluation: Family Literacy at Simmons College
    7. From Dysfunction to Coordination: America Reads at the University of Minnesota
    8. Nurturing the Whole Student: Service-based Programs at Pfeiffer University
    9. Creative Solutions: Summer Work-Study and Professional Placements at the University of Montana
    10. Testing Tutor Training Effectiveness: Service-Learning at Fresno State
    11. The Student Ambassador Leadership Model: FWS and Service-Learning at Miami Dade College
    12. Creating Public Service Leaders: Student-Led Work at Harvard College
    13. “I Found Out What I Want to Do”: FWS and Workforce Development at Central Piedmont Community College
    14. Take the Lead: A Transformative Leadership Series at Oberlin College
    15. Beginning Leadership: FWS and Student Leaders at Linn-Benton Community College

Appendices

  1. Tools for Managing Community Service FWS Programs
  2. Community Service Work-Study Report Adobe Acrobat Document Erin Bowley and Marsha Adler
  3. To Serve the College or the Community? Adobe Acrobat Document 700KB
    Results from a Study on Community Service Federal Work-Study Erin Bowley
    Note: This article appeared in Student Aid Transcript magazine, Vol 14, N. 2. Copyright 2003, National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. Reproduced with permission.

Index of Campuses Profiled

I have always had a drive to serve others and work for the common good. But I never fully realized that I could go beyond volunteerism--that my opinion and hard work could influence policy decisions. My views changed when I sat in the office of one of my legislators in Washington, DC."

-Amanda Coffin, University of Maine at Farmington, Campus Compact student leader