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Campus Compact > Initiatives > The Research University Civic Engagement Network (TRUCEN)
Civic Engagement at Research Universities
> Research University Engaged Scholarship Toolkit > Exemplars of Engaged Scholarship

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Exemplars of Engaged Scholarship

  • Alexander, M., Viavattene, C., Faulker, H., & Priest, S. (2013). Translating the complexities of flood risk science using KEEPER—a knowledge exchange exploratory tool for professionals in emergency response. Journal of Flood Risk Management. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfr3.12042/abstract
    • Within flood risk management (FRM) decision-making, there is a growing interest in participatory approaches to engage and integrate stakeholder expertise. This paper reports on the construction of a geographic information system-based flood risk assessment tool, KEEPER—a Knowledge Exchange Exploratory tool for Professionals in Emergency Response. An iterative methodology was used to engage emergency professionals throughout the research process, allowing a mixing of scientific and professional expertise in the co-production of KEEPER. This paper argues that participation is essential both for supporting pragmatic flood research and as a means of enhancing communication across traditionally divided communities.
  • Ampartzaki, M., Kypriotaki, M., Voreadou, C., Dardioti, A., & Stathi, I. (2012). Communities of practice and participatory action research: the formation of a synergy for the development of museum programmes for early childhood. Educational Action Research, 21(1), 4-27. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09650792.2013.761920#.UeeKcFO9xgY
    • The paper presents a case study of a community of educational practice formed by the synergy between a natural history museum and a university department of pre-school education, which undertook participatory action research aimed at the creation of innovative museum programs for young children. The case study is evaluated, and the findings show that the community of practice was able to bring situated knowledge into question and interrogate propositional knowledge by means of participatory action research. The authors conclude that participatory action research enabled the community to monitor the implementation of theory with scientific rigor and formulate a new “knowledge strategy”, which in theoretical terms will guide future developments.
  • Andrews, J. O., Tingen, M. S., Jarriel, S. C., Caleb, M., Simmons, A., Brunson, J.,…Hurman, C. (2012). Application of a CBPR framework to inform a multi-level tobacco cessation intervention in public housing neighborhoods. American Journal of Community Psychology, 50(1), 129-140. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10464-011-9482-6
    • This paper describes the application of a CBPR framework to inform a culturally situated, ecological based, multi-level tobacco cessation intervention in public housing neighborhoods. During this decade-long intervention project, community and academic partners used the CBPR framework to guide problem identification, planning and feasibility testing, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination. Successes and challenges of the prevention intervention and partnership are discussed. Implications for other CBPR partnerships are discussed.
  • Baillie, C., Pawley, A., & Riley, D.M. (2012). Engineering and social justice in the university and beyond. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press. http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/engineering-and-social-justice-university-and-beyond
    • This book describes the work of international scholars aiming to integrate engineering with social justice, focusing on the role of scholars in teaching, research, and community engagement. From discussing how courses can be designed to encourage engagement, to how scholars are conducting research to improve the lives of marginalized communities, this book features a variety of perspectives on ways engineering can achieve social impact.
  • Bates, D., Burman, E., Ejike-King, L., & Rufyiri, C. (2012). Healthy transitions: A community-based participatory research approach with Burundians with refugee status. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(3), 153-173. http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/874
    • This paper describes a CBPR project conducted by the University of Tennessee’s Healthy Transitions program, which partners the university with a local community of Burundian refugees. The project examined the Burundians’ experiences and perceptions during and post migration through focus groups. The authors discuss the impact of the CPBR approach, and conclude that the approach was essential to the productive process of data collection, to the subsequent implementation of culturally-relevant interventions, and to enabling the Burundian community to co-direct ongoing research and programming.
  • Bazos, D. A., Schifferdecker, K. E., Fedrizzi, R., Hoebeke, J., Ruggles, L. & Goldsberry, Y. (2013). Action-learning collaboratives as a platform for community-based participatory research to advance obesity prevention. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 24(2, Supplement), 61-79.
    http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/hpu/summary/v024/24.2A.bazos.html

    • One model for implementing and monitoring CBPR is Action Learning Collaboratives (ALCs)—short term, team-based learning processes that are grounded in quality improvement. This paper describes how the Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth has used ALCs with three communities as a platform to design, implement and evaluate CBPR. The authors provide recommendations for using ALCs as a method to promote CBPR and evidence-based obesity prevention through a structured QI approach.
  • Birbeck, G. L. (2012). Working together to improve the lives of people affected by epilepsy in Zambia. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(3), 175-183. http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/875
    • This paper describes the Chikankata Epilepsy Care Team, a collaborative project between Michigan State University and the rural Zambian community of Chikankata, which works to improve the lives of people with epilepsy. The author describes the project’s evolution from a local nurse-medical student partnership in one rural Zambian hospital to a program that enriches clinical services and advocacy programs throughout Zambia. Lessons learned about what makes this collaborative project effective are presented.
  • Boone, K. (2012). Cellphone diaries: Mobile technology and self-authored digital videos in asset mapping. PRISM: A Journal of Regional Engagement, 1(2), 172-183. http://encompass.eku.edu/prism/vol1/iss2/7
    • This paper describes the Cellphone Diaries project, which engaged African-American residents of historic South Park East Raleigh, North Carolina in the use of “smartphones” to document places that had meaning to them in Chavis Park, a neighborhood undergoing rapid change. The project was a component of an effort by North Carolina State University to support a neighborhood revitalization framework organized around a community vision plan. Cellphone Diaries attempted to 1) train residents in the use of smartphone digital videos for individual on-site asset mapping, and 2) compare the results of individual on-site smartphone based approaches to concurrent engagement efforts such as individual off-site interviews and off-site community workshops. The successes and challenges of the cellphone diaries approach are discussed.
  • Braithwaite, R. L., McKenzie, R. D., Pruitt, V., Holden, K. B., Aaron, K., & Hollimon, C. (2013). Community-based participatory evaluation: The Healthy Start approach. Health Promotion Practice, 14(2), 213-219. http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/14/2/213
    • This paper presents a community-based participatory evaluation (CBPE) conducted by the Healthy Start project of the Augusta Partnership for Children, Inc. (APC), in Augusta, Georgia. CBPE refers to a process in which community members perform an integral function in the design, implementation, and review of assessment procedures, and academic faculty take on the role of external evaluators. The APC’s model for CPBE is presented. Reflecting on this model, the authors argue that it improved the relevance of the evaluation process, and shows promise as a reliable and credible evaluation approach for assessment of health promotion programs.
  • Brazg, T., Bekemeier, B., Spigner, C., & Huebner, C.E. (2011). Our community in focus: The use of photovoice for youth-driven substance abuse assessment and health promotion. Health Promotion Practice, 12(4), 502-511. http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/early/2010/11/03/1524839909358659
    • Photovoice, a CBPR methodology, is one way to effectively engage youth in the assessment of substance abuse and prevention initiatives. This paper describes “Our Community in Focus”, a community-based assessment of youth substance use and abuse that employed photovoice methodology with high school participants. Prompted with the question, “What contributes to adolescents’ decisions to use or not to use alcohol and other drugs?” participants captured compelling photos to reflect community strengths and concerns relating to substance abuse. The authors explore the findings of the research and offer conclusions about photovoice as an effective tool to engage youth in community-assessment projects.
  • Browne, R. et al. (2009). Community – academic partnerships: Lessons learned from replicating a salon-based health education and promotion program. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 3(3), 241-248.
    • This article examines a partnership between the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health (AAIUH), two community-based organizations (CBOs), three universities, and 17 beauty salons. This partnership was created to replicate a salon-based health education and promotion program in African-American and Latino communities in Philadelphia, and its formation was guided by common understanding of four key principles: mutually agreeing on and implementing predefined plans and processes; sharing expertise, resources, and methods; a commitment to building capacity; a commitment to shared credits and rewards. These principles are described, as well as the challenges and lessons learned from both the development of the community-academic partnership and the program replication process. In conclusion, the article demonstrates the overall effectiveness of the partnership and program replication, citing indicators such as leveraging additional funding and results from salon-based surveys that showed a large increase in community me
  • Buettgen, A., Richardson, J., Beckman, K., Richardson, K., Ward, M., & Riemer, M. (2012). We did it together: a participatory action research study on poverty and disability. Disability & Society, 27(5), 603-616.
    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09687599.2012.669106#preview

    • This article describes a participatory action research project on poverty and disability, and presents the perspectives of both non-disabled and developmentally disabled people involved in the project. During the study, control of the research agenda was shared to varying degrees in accordance with the needs and desires of the members of an advisory committee of low-income, developmentally disabled people. The authors discuss their successes and challenges enacting participatory action research principles, in the hopes of enabling future researchers to be more inclusive of developmentally disabled people in their work.
  • Burns, D., Hyde, P., Killett, A., Poland, F., & Gray, R. (2012). Participatory organizational research: Examining voice in the co-production of knowledge. British Journal of Management, 1-12. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8551.2012.00841.x/abstract
    • This paper proposes the term participatory organizational research (POR) to describe participatory methods in management research. The authors argue that POR has significant potential for management researchers, because it allows unheard organizational members to generate alternative perspectives that can offer the potential for the co-production of new forms of knowledge that are locally relevant. By examining a study of care quality in elder care institutions, the authors explain in detail how POR can enable voice, and also explore some of the structural limitations of the POR approach.
  • Bushouse, B., Jacobson, W.S., Lambright, K.T., Llorens, J.L., Morse, R.S., & Poocharoen, O. (2011). Crossing the divide: Building bridges between public administration practitioners and scholars. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 21 (1), 99-112. http://jpart.oxfordjournals.org/content/21/suppl_1/i99.abstract
    • This article explores the challenges of improving the connection between public administration (PA) scholarship and practice in three areas: engaged scholarship, engaged teaching, and engaged faculty. Examples of solutions to improve the connection between PA scholarship and practice are also discussed.
  • Campano, G., Ghiso, M. P., Yee, M. & Pantoja, A. (2013). Toward community research and coalitional literacy practices for educational justice. Language Arts, 90(5), 314-326.
    http://www.ncte.org/journals/la/issues/v90-5

    • In this article, the authors examine emerging directions in their participatory research that point toward coalitional literacy practices as a means of intercultural collaboration. The authors define “coalitional literacies” as critical social practices whereby community members enact language and literacy across cultural boundaries in order to learn from others, be reflective with respect to social location, foster empathy, cultivate affective bonds, and promote inclusion in the service of progressive change. The authors begin by situating their understanding of coalitional literacies in the educational research literature, and then use Critical Discourse Analysis and other analytical approaches to show how their research is an illustrative case of grass-roots coalitional work. They conclude by spotlighting one of their current participatory research projects, which, building from the coalitional energy at the site, investigates families’ educational experiences and works toward a shared vision of social justice.
  • Campus Compact (2009). Models of civic engagement initiatives at research universities.
    • TRUCEN member research universities have provided examples of how they structure civic and community engagement initiatives and activities on campuses.
  • Carney, G. M., Dundon, T., & Léime, A. N. (2012). Participatory action research with and within community activist groups: Capturing the collective experience of Ireland’s community and voluntary pillar in social partnership. Action Research, 10(3), 313-330.
    http://arj.sagepub.com/content/10/3/313

    • This article presents a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study that constructed an all-inclusive account of the lived experienced of Civil Society Organizations in the Community and Voluntary Pillar of social partnership in Ireland. The authors reflect on the rewards and challenges of using a PAR approach to design and execute the study, and to integrate participants into the research process. Overall, this article shows how the use of PAR can present a deeper and more holistic picture of the experience of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in shaping national-level social policy.
  • Case, C., & Hawthorne, T. L. (2013). Served or unserved? A site suitability analysis of social services in Atlanta, Georgia using geographic information systems. Journal of Applied Geography, 38, 96-106. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622812001385
    • In this study, investigators utilize a Public Participation GIS (PPGIS) research framework with multiple community partners to understand accessibility to social service providers in a subset of lower income zip codes across Atlanta, Georgia. The study has practical and actionable implications for lower income urban communities, and methodological implications for the disciplines of geography, public health and planning.
  • Catalini, C.E.C.V., Veneziale, A. Campbell, L., Herbst, S., Butler, B., Springgate, B., & Minkler, M. (2012). Videovoice: Community assessment in post-Katrina New Orleans. Health Promotion Practice, 13(1), 18-28. http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/09/03/1524839910369070.abstract?rss=1
    • Videovoice is a health advocacy, promotion, and research method through which people use video cameras as a tool to research issues, communicate knowledge, and advocate for change. This paper explores a videovoice project carried out in post-Katrina New Orleans by a community-university-filmmaker partnership, in which 10 community members participated in an 18-week training and community assessment. The authors describe how the final product (a 22-minute film) successfully communicated knowledge to many audiences (live premier, YouTube, DVD distribution) and mobilized community action on three issues: affordable housing, education, and economic development. The paper concludes by discussing particular challenges of videovoice and the effectiveness of this method as a participatory and equitable research approach.
  • Chang, C., Minkler, M., Salvatore, A. L., Lee, P. T., Gaydos, M., Liu, S. S. (2013). Studying and addressing urban immigrant restaurant worker health and safety in San Francisco’s Chinatown District: A CBPR case study. Journal of Urban Health. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11524-013-9804-0
    • This paper highlights eight ways in which CBPR has been shown to add value to work with urban underserved communities. Challenges of using CBPR, particularly with urban immigrant populations, are also discussed. The authors then describe the Chinatown Restaurant Worker Health and Safety Study, a CBPR project conducted in San Francisco, California, and draw on study processes and outcomes to illustrate each of the benefits and challenges of CBPR. Finally, the authors discuss lessons learned, through the Chinatown study and other studies, for the effective use of CBPR with urban immigrant communities.
  • Colucci-Gray, L., Sharmistha, D., Gray, D., Robson, D., & Spratt, J. (2013). Evidence-based practice and teacher action-research: a reflection on the nature and direction of ‘change’. British Educational Research Journal, 39(1), 126-147. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1080/01411926.2011.615389/abstract
    • This study looked at the impact of a scholarship initiative supporting classroom teachers to undertake action-research projects on a topic of their own choice with the assistance of a mentor. Data collected from interviews with teachers and analysis of teacher action-research reports pointed to a multi-faceted concept of practice unfolding from individual inquiry and dialogical conversations with colleagues and university mentors.
  • Cortez, P., Dumas, T., Joyce, J., & Olson, D. (2011). Survivor voices: Co-learning, re-connection, and healing through community action research and engagement (CARE). Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 5(2), 133-142. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21623015
    • This paper examines the community-campus partnership between the Trauma Healing Project (THP) and the University of Oregon Psychology and Counseling Services Department, examining Survivor Voices, a community-based PAR mixed methods study that was developed and implemented through this partnership. This collaboratively designed study aimed to understand from survivors of abuse “what hurt” and “what helped” from the process of dealing with trauma and what recommendations these survivors could provide about trauma healing. Methods, quantitative/qualitative results, and challenges/lessons learned are presented, as well as a section reflecting on how the partnership and PAR methods can be useful tools in a community’s ability to address abuse and reduce violence.
  • Cuthill, M. (2010). Working together: A methodological case study of ‘Engaged Scholarship’. Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, 3, 20–37.
    • This paper explores the University of Queensland’s Boilerhouse Community Engagement Centre (UQ Boilerhouse) as a case study for engaged scholarship in practice. Informed by principles of participatory action research (PAR), the paper describes the three stages of the methodological framework guiding the work of UQ Boilerhouse: project development and design, data collection and analysis, and reporting and project evaluation. In conclusion, the paper examines ways in which PAR can effectively promote participatory democracy, and discusses particular constraints and challenges of the PAR process.
  • Davies, A., Mbete, B., Fegan, G., Molyneux, S., & Kinyanjui, S. (2012). Seeing ‘With my Own Eyes’: Strengthening interactions between researchers and schools. Institute of Development Studies Bulletin, 43(5), 61-67.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1759-5436.2012.00364.x/abstract

    • This paper describes a participatory action research (PAR) project initiated by the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), as part of their Wellcome Trust Research Programme’s (KWTRP) community engagement strategy in Kilifi. The project, called the School Engagement Programme (SEP), partnered students and teachers from secondary schools, and scientists from KWTRP, to design and implement a set of interventions aimed at promoting school awareness of locally conducted research, and positive attitudes towards school science and health research. The article presents findings from an evaluation of the SEP, which was conducted through surveys and discussions with teachers, students, researchers, and other stakeholders.
  • Doberneck, D. M., Miller, P. K., & Schweitzer, J. (2012). Sometimes there are no notes: An auto ethnographic essay of a collaboration at the engagement interface. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(3), 57-85. http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/863
    • This autoethnographic essay represents the authors’ critical reflection on their experiences partnering with Liz Lerman and Dance Exchange (a dance company) artists on a collaborative evaluation of “The Matter of Origins”, a contemporary art and science dance performance. They describe meaningful moments in their collaboration, and reexamine those moments in the broader context of scholarly community engagement. Based on this reflection, the authors identify themes including ethnographic approaches to collaboration, shared systems of meaning, and developmental evaluation to understand the complex experiences that took place at the engagement interface. The essay concludes with suggested reflective questions for scholars to consider in their own community engagement activities.
  • Fox, M., & Fine, M. (2013). Accountable to whom? A critical science counter-story about a city that stopped caring for its young. Children & Society, 27(4), 321-335.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/chso.12031/abstract

    • This article sketches a participatory action research project, Polling for Justice (PFJ), which was designed by youth and adults in New York City to evaluate the impact of neo-liberal public policies on young people. PFJ examined young people’s experiences of urban public policy using a critical participatory research approach in which young people had power to shape inquiry into their experiences, decide how to interpret the findings, and then take a lead role in action, in part through radically inverting conventional understandings of who/what should be held accountable. Using the story of PFJ, the authors propose that reconsidering accountability at the point of knowledge production is generative for reimagining, and realizing a more just world.
  • Frabutt, J.M. (2010). Supporting community safety through university-community partnerships: Exploring models of engagement. Journal of Community Engagement, 1(2), 1-13. https://discovery.indstate.edu/ojs/index.php/joce/article/view/92/31
    • This paper highlights four six-year long projects to explore various models of university-community engagement supporting violence prevention and community safety. These case examples, from the Center for Youth, Family, and Community Partnerships at UNC Greensboro, address issues such as funding, community collaboration, sustainability, leadership, evaluation, and communication.
  • Garcia, C., Hermann, D., Bartels, A., Matamoros, P., Dick-Olson, L., & Guerra de Patino, J. (2012). Development of Project Wings Home Visits, a mental health intervention for Latino families using community-based participatory research. Health Promotion Practice, 13(6), 755-762. http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/13/6/755
    • This article details the steps undertaken to develop Project Wings Home Visits, a collaborative school-based, community-linked mental health promotion intervention for Latino adolescents and their families. The intervention was developed using a CBPR approach that involved the cooperation of a community health care system, a public high school, and a university. The process of Project Wings Home Visits demonstrates the benefits and challenges of using CBPR in creating and implementing health promotion interventions.
  • Green, A., & Kearney, J. (2011). Participatory action learning and action research for self-sustaining community development: Engaging Pacific Islanders in Southeast Queensland. The Australasian Journal of University-Community Engagement, 6(1), 46-68. http://engagementaustralia.org.au/shared-resources/publications/journals/
    • This paper describes a university-community initiative aimed at improving educational opportunities within a Samoan community in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The initiative demonstrates how participatory action learning and action research processes were used to build the capacity of the Samoan community to address self-identified community needs. These strategies enabled community members to develop and sustain their own projects, and equipped them to pass this ability on to other community members, creating long-term project continuity.
  • Griffith, Derek M. et al. (2009). The origins and overview of the W. K. Kellogg Community Health Scholars Program. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 3(4), 335-348.
    • This paper describes the history, components and evaluations of the W. K. Kellogg Community Health Scholars Program (CHSP). From 1998 to 2007, CHSP trained 46 postdoctoral fellows to develop and enhance skills in working with communities and engage in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Its design and implementation exemplified the partnership principles at the core of the training it provided. Evaluations have shown that CHSP has had substantial impact not only on its participants, but also on academic institutions, community-based organizations (CBOs), policies relating to research funding and implementation, and professional organizations. A key element in this impact has been the continued interaction of CHSP alumni and their academic and community mentors and partners. Key lessons learned from the evaluations are explored.
  • Groen, J. & Hyland-Russell, T. (2012). Let’s start at the very beginning: the impact of program origins and negotiated community-university partnerships on Canadian radical humanities programs. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 31(6), 779-797.
    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02601370.2012.723050#.UenZIVO9xgY

    • This article examines the community-university partnerships and the planning process of three Canadian Radical Humanities programs: programs that offer university entry-level humanities to adult learners on the margins of society. Examining these three iterations reveals (1) the importance of clarifying roles and expectations in community-university partnerships, and (2) the significance of program origins, particularly the introduction of frame factors shaping student options and the potential for institutional change.
  • Gwede, C. K., Castro, E., Brandon, T. H., McIntyre, J., Meade, C. D., Munoz-Antonia, T.,…Quinn, G., P. (2012). Developing strategies for reducing cancer disparities via cross-institutional collaboration: Outreach efforts for the partnership between the Ponce School of Medicine and the Moffitt Cancer Center. Health Promotion Practice, 13(6), 807-815.
    http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/13/6/807

    • This article reports on a collaborative academic institutional partnership between a minority-serving institution and a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center. This partnership launched an outreach program to address cancer health disparities in two Hispanic communities in Puerto Rico and Florida. This article outlines the program’s initial collaborative strategies and activities in community outreach, cancer education and research that mutually benefit the Hispanic communities in both Puerto Rico and Florida. Lessons learned and challenges faced by the Outreach Program are presented.
  • Hall, M. et al (2009). Gateways: International journal of community research and engagement. http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/ijcre
    • This special edition frames emerging responses to the challenges of social responsiveness at the University of Cape Town. The articles include university-community collaborations around the HIV/AIDS crisis, managing coastal resources, xenophobia, disaster planning and innovation in manufacturing. Gateways is a refereed journal concerned with the practice and processes of community research and other forms of engagement. It provides a forum for academics, practitioners and community representatives to pursue issues and reflect on practices related to interactions between tertiary institutions and community organizations: academic interventions in community; community-based projects with links to the tertiary sector; and community initiatives.
  • Hannay, J., Dudley, R., Milan, S., & Leibovitz, P. K. (2013). Combining photovoice and focus groups: Engaging Latina teens in community assessment. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44(3, Supplement 3), S215-S224. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379712008744
    • This article presents a study that combined photovoice (a CBPR methodology) with focus groups to engage Latina teens and their parents in identifying barriers to physical activity and initiating policy actions to address them. The authors also investigate the effectiveness of applying photovoice as both an evaluation tool and a leadership/advocacy intervention in this study.
  • Hutchinson, A., & Lovell, A. (2013). Participatory action research: moving beyond the mental health ‘service user’ identity. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 20(7), 641-649.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpm.12001/abstract

    • This paper discusses the process of a participatory action research study that was facilitated by a mental health nurse and involved six people who use statutory mental health services as co-researchers. The process of recruiting and training the service-user researchers is described. The paper also highlights the perspective of the service-user researchers on the process of being involved in the research, as well as the impact that this involvement had on them considering a move beyond the mental illness identity.
  • Huzzard, T., Ahlberg, B.M., & Ekman, M. (2010). Constructing interorganizational collaboration: The action researcher as a boundary subject. Action Research, 8(3), 293-314.
    http://arj.sagepub.com/content/8/3/293.abstract
    • This article aims to explore critically the role of an action research team in the social construction of inter-organizational collaboration aimed at transgressing organizational and professional boundaries. We argue that the new relationships, actor conceptions and in some cases forms of work organization arising from the change process have been socially constructed through the discursive interventions of the researchers. This has largely occurred through informal interaction with and between the actors engaged in the development process. The action researcher, rather than being a neutral discursive gatekeeper in collaborative development projects, is an active constructor of the discourse shaping the collaboration. A case is presented showing how the researcher role is thus better seen as being an active boundary subject mediating across various professional and organizational perspectives rather than a passive boundary object. Accordingly, by focusing on the discursive role of active researchers as boundary subjects, we can reflect more critically on the roles we adopt in our intervention endeavors and their inevitably political nature. (Huzzard, Ahlberg & Ekman, 2010, p. 293)
  • Jernigan, V. B. B. (2010). Community-based participatory research with Native American communities: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. Health Promotion Practice, 11(6), 888-899.
    • This article provides an overview of the use of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) with Native American communities and discusses the translation of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program using a CBPR approach with an urban Native American community. This article highlights not only how the CBPR process facilitates the successful translation of the Stanford program but also how CBPR is used within this community to build community capacity. The author provides a detailed account of her experience and concludes that the project’s success was due to its “truly peer-led” participatory approach and the empowerment of those who participated.
  • Johnson, J.C. et al. (2009). Building community participatory research coalitions from the ground up: The Philadelphia Area Research Community Coalition. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 3(1), 61-72.
    • The Philadelphia Area Research Community Coalition (PARCC) was formed in 2005 by the University of Pennsylvania – Cheyney University of Pennsylvania EXPORT Center. PARCC is a community-academic research partnership that is comprised of 22 organizations and programs of distinct sizes and varied experience in health research. This paper explores PARCC’s process of developing this coalition, the outcomes achieved, governing principles and lessons learned. The developmental processes reviewed include the partnership’s conceptual framework, methods of recruitment of members, working with varied community and academic perspectives on research, the contextual significance of trust as a core tenet of PARCC, and the establishment of the coalition’s structure and internal processes (governance and operating principles). The paper describes PARCC’s success and attributes it to factors such as trust between members of the community and academia, committed leaders and members, preexisting relationships, and effective research training programs. Challenges facing PARCC include a lack of academic scholars willing and able to join community research projects and securing long-term funding. The paper concludes by emphasizing the importance of training partners in the early stages of engagement while trust, governance structure and operations are still developing.
  • Kamanda, A., Embleton, L., Ayuku, D., Atwoli, L., Gisore, P., Ayaya, S., … Braitstein, P. (2013). Harnessing the power of the grassroots to conduct public health research in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study from western Kenya in the adaptation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches. BMC Public Health, 13.
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/91

    • This paper describes the Orphaned and Separated Children’s Assessments Related to their Health and Well-Being (OSCAR) project, a longitudinal epidemiological study in sub-Saharan Africa that used a CBPR framework. The authors discuss how they incorporated and adapted CBPR approaches and principles during four phases of the project: 1) community engagement, 2) sampling and recruitment, 3) retention, validation, and follow-up, and 4) analysis, interpretation, and dissemination. The authors discuss how community participation throughout these phases enabled and strengthened the project.
  • Katz, D L., Murimi, M., Gonzalez, A., Njike, V., & Green, L.W. (2011). From controlled trial to community adoption: The multisite translational community trial. American Journal of Public Health. 101(8), e17-e27. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/toc/ajph/101/8
    • A standardized research methodology for translating findings from controlled trials into community application is needed. This paper introduces the multisite translational community trial (mTCT) as the research analog to the multisite randomized controlled trial. The mTCT is adapted to incorporate principles and practices of community-based participatory research to increase relevance and generalizability gained from research in diverse community settings. The mTCT is a tool designed to bridge the gap between what a clinical trial demonstrates can work in principle and what is needed to make it workable and effective in the real-world. Its utility could be put to the test, in particular with practice-based research networks such as Prevention Research Centers.
  • Lassiter, L. E. (2012). ‘To fill in the missing piece of the Middletown puzzle’: lessons from re-studying Middletown. The Sociological Review, 60(3), 421-437. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2012.02092.x/abstract
    • This paper revisits The Other Side of Middletown, a collaborative ethnography written by a group of faculty, students, and African Americans living in Muncie, Indiana—the town made famous by Robert and Helen Lynd in their 1929 original study, “Middletown”, and its 1937 follow-up, “Middletown in Transition”. The study “The Other Side of Middletown” addressed the lack of African American history and experience in the Lynds’ works, and used a collaborative approach to research and writing. Here, the author describes the social and relational contexts in which the study first developed; elaborates its connections to the Lynds’ original Middletown studies; summarizes the study’s approach and findings; and offers lessons related to collaborative research that emerged during the project.
  • Lemelin, R. H., Wiersma, E. C., Trapper, L., Kapashesit, R., Beaulieu, M. S., & Dowsley, M. (2013). A dialogue and reflection on photohistory: Engaging indigenous communities in research through visual analysis. Action Research, 11(1), 92-107. http://arj.sagepub.com/content/11/1/92
    • This paper describes the application of a methodology termed “photohistory” in a study examining visual depictions of cultural and environmental changes in two First Nations in northern Ontario, Canada. Photohistory combines elements of participatory photography and ethnohistorical approaches, and is the historical collection and analysis of photographs with participants enabling potential temporal comparison of landscape transformations, identification of ancestors, and assertions of socio-cultural continuity. The authors describe the photohistory methodology in detail, highlight the issues that arose while attempting to implement photohistory in their study, and outline what they learned from this process.
  • Letiecq, B., & Schmalzbauer, L. (2012). Community-based participatory research with Mexican migrants in a new rural destination: A good fit? Action Research, 10(3), 244-259.
    http://arj.sagepub.com/content/10/3/244

    • In this article, the authors reflect on their CBPR project, Salud y Comunidad: Latinos en Montana, which partnered with Mexican migrants in a new rural destination of the Rocky Mountain West. The authors discuss the context of the Montana migrant community, how they forged a research partnership, and the details of their CBPR project. Finally, they attempt to reframe some of the tensions and paradoxes inherent in community-based work with vulnerable communities, and reflect on the question, ‘is CBPR a good fit?’
  • Martinez, L. S., Perea, F. C., Ursillo, A., Pirie, A., Ndulue, U., Oliviera, C. & Gute, D. (2012). Research as curriculum: Engaging undergraduates and community residents in immigrant health research partnerships. Progress in Community Health Partnerships, 6(4), 491-498. http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/cpr/summary/v006/6.4.martinez.html
    • This paper reports on a project that used a research-as-curriculum model to engage undergraduate students and community members in collaborative community health research. A community health study was designed and implemented collaboratively by students, local community residents, service providers, and faculty, in the context of an undergraduate research that used partnership research as the pedagogy. The development, implementation, and outcomes of this project are discussed.
  • McClellan, M. (2009). History at work: a public history project. Original Toolkit Essay. History-at work.pdf
    • Michelle McClellan, historian at the University of Michigan, received an Arts of Citizenship engaged scholarship grant for developing and teaching a public history course and for scholarship deriving from her work on a public history project. In this two-part article, McClellan describes the proposed project that was awarded Arts of Citizenship funding, then reflects on the experience—how it will affect her future teaching and future historical scholarship.
  • Michigan State University et al (2006-2009). The engaged scholar magazine. http://engagedscholar.msu.edu/Default.aspx
    • The Engaged Scholar Magazine focuses on collaborative partnerships between Michigan State University and its external constituents—partnerships forged for mutual benefit and learning, with an emphasis on research. The magazine is published annually, in the fall of each year, in both hard copy and web versions. Annual issues are themed, e.g. sustainability, cultural entrepreneurship, families. Current and archived magazine editions are available online as are editions of the Engaged Scholar E-Newsletter, a quarterly online supplement to The Engaged Scholar Magazine.
  • Minkler, M. et al (2008). Promoting healthy public policy through community-based participatory research: Ten case studies, PolicyLink and School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. http://www.policylink.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lkIXLbMNJrE&b=5136581&ct=6996033
    • 10 case studies of diverse community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships around the United States that have in common a commitment to foster healthy public policy through scholarly research findings that are translated and used in ways that can promote the public’s health and well-being.
  • Moloney, M. & Church, L. (2012). Engaged scholarship: Action design research for new software product development. Thirty Third International Conference on Information Systems. http://aisel.aisnet.org/icis2012/proceedings/EngagedScholarship/1/
    • Action Design Research (ADR) has been termed a new research method for generating prescriptive design knowledge through building and evaluating ensemble IT artifacts in an organizational setting. This paper demonstrates the use of ADR methodology in a New Software Product Development (NSPD) environment. While increased pressure on organizations to reduce costs and “time to market” have made the NSPD environment increasingly less conducive to engaged scholarship, this case study presented demonstrates that the ADR methodology can facilitate successful research-practitioner engagement in the NSPD environment.
  • Nyden, P. (2009). Collaborative university-community research teams. Original Toolkit essay. Collaborative-university-community-research-teams.pdf
    • This essay profiles Loyola University’s Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL), which organizes and sponsors collaborative university-community research in the Chicago area, which emphasizes the bringing of a “communities eyes, ears, and voice to the research table.”
  • Nyden, P., Hossfeld, L.H., & Nyden, G.E. (2012). Public sociology: research, action, and change. Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press.
    • This book explores the many ways in which sociology brings about social change, written by authors who work on the forefront of the public sociology movement. The book begins with four chapters on the following topics: sociological imagination and engaged scholarship, sharing knowledge through university-community collaboration, starting and sustaining projects, and a career guide for public sociologists. The book continues with eight chapters of case studies, and concludes making the case for a new, engaged 21st century scholarship.
  • Orr, K., & Bennett, M. (2012). Public administration scholarship and the politics of coproducing academic-practitioner research. Public Administration Review, 72(4), 487-496. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6210.2011.02522.x/full
    • This article considers the politics of cooperative knowledge production between practitioners and academics in the field of public administration. In this article, “politics” refers to the long-standing and ongoing debates about the purpose of public administration scholarship, and the tricky issues that arise when academics and practitioners collaborate. The authors, an academic and practitioner, reflect on their own experience of coproducing a public administration research project in the United Kingdom.
  • Podger, D., Velasco, I. Amezcua, L., Burford, G., & Harder, M. K. (2013). Can values be measured? Significant contributions from a small civil society organization through action research. Action Research, 11(1), 8-30. http://arj.sagepub.com/content/11/1/8
    • This paper describes an action research study conducted by researchers and a civil society organization (CSO) to investigate the relevance and usability of a values-based indicator framework for CSOs. The authors discuss several useful insights that emerged from the study, and the importance of these findings to other studies on values and to design issues central to formal values-based measurement work. The authors also discuss how the principles of emancipatory action research used during this study were key to its effectiveness.
  • Polivka, B. J., Chaudry, R., Crawford, J. M., Wilson, R., & Galos, D. (2013). Application and modification of the integrative model for environmental health. Public Health Nursing, 30(2), 167-176.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1525-1446.2012.01050.x/abstract

    • The Integrative Model for Environmental Health (IMEH) has guided research, literature reviews, and practice initiatives since 2002. This article presents the Modified IMEH that was developed based on using the IMEH as a guiding conceptual framework in a CBPR environmental health project. The authors discuss how they developed the Modified IMEH, how it differs from the original IMEH, and how it can be applied in the future.
  • Pyne, K. B., Scott, M. A., & Long, D. T. (2013). From structural inequities to speaking out: Youth participatory action research in college access collaborations. PRISM: A Journal of Regional Engagement, 2(1), 51-70. http://encompass.eku.edu/prism/vol2/iss1/4/
    • This article describes how a youth participatory action research project (YPAR) supported an ongoing university-community partnership between a university and the local public school community. In 2010, an “academy”, a college access and success program for high school youth developed through this partnership, initiated a YPAR project to study the challenges that limited-income, first-generation, and minority students faced on their path to college. The authors describe the positive outcomes of YPAR, as well as the struggles faced by the project.
  • Richardson, L. (2013). Putting the research boot on the policymakers’ foot: Can participatory approaches change the relationship between policymakers and evaluation. Social Policy & Administration, 47(4), 483-500. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spol.12031/full
    • This paper presents a case study of a self-evaluation by local government politicians. The authors then discuss the lessons learned about the characteristics of a successful self-evaluation, the process of engaging policymakers in research, and the feasibility of positivist participatory research. The authors also contextualize the case study by describing the current relationship between politics and science in policy decision-making, and the tensions between participatory research and positivist methods that exist in current research approaches.
  • Rojas, A., Sipos, Y., & Valley, W. (2012). Reflection on 10 years of community-engaged scholarship in the faculty of land and food systems at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(1), 195-211. http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/756
    • This paper explores a transition in which faculty members in Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia–Vancouver moved from community-inquiry projects to com¬munity-engaged action research projects. The transition was achieved through organizational restructuring, curricular revision, and new teaching approaches. The paper discusses the concepts that influenced the curricular revision and examines outcomes of the faculty transition and lessons learned.
  • Russell, A., Cattermole, A., Hudson, R., Banks, S., Armstrong, A., Robinson, F., … Brown, G. (2011). Sustaining community-university collaborations: The Durham University model. Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, 4, 218-31. http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/journals/index.php/ijcre/article/view/1781
    • This article describes how a group of people worked to change the surrounding region’s perception of Durham University (United Kingdom) from an elitist institution to a civically engaged one. The Durham Model is founded on four principles (empowerment, partnership, education, leadership) with the goal of supporting engaged scholarship initiatives between faculty and the community of Durham County. Characterized as organic, multifaceted, responsive, and sustainable, aspects of this model have become increasingly integrated into the university’s structures. The authors discuss how to endure sustainability, the lessons learned, and their future vision for the partnership model in Durham.
  • Santilli, A., Caroll-Scott, A., Wong, F., & Ickovics, J. (2011). Urban youths go 3000 miles: Engaging and supporting young residents to conduct neighborhood asset mapping. American Journal of Public Health, 101(12), 2207-2210. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222416/?tool=pubmed
    • In 2009 the Community Alliance for Research and Engagement at Yale University (CARE) implemented a multisectoral chronic disease prevention initiative called Community Interventions for Health, in which seven local high school students were hired to conduct asset mapping. This paper provides a detailed description of how youth mapped assets in their communities, personal quotes from youth about their participation, and an evaluation of youth-driven asset mapping as a method.
  • Schaffer, R. H. (2012). Nonprofit and university strategic partnerships to strengthen the sector. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 23(1), 105-119. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nml.21057/abstract
    • This article presents a pilot program in which undergraduate students, faculty, and nonprofits conducted a joint research study to address management challenges of the non-profit partners. The program centered on an undergraduate course through which students implemented a research study in partnership with local nonprofit organizations, analyzed the results, and presented their findings at a professional development conference. This article discusses the formation of the course learning objectives, course implementation, and outcomes. Suggestions are made for practitioners and faculty who wish to develop a similar model.
  • Schubert, P., & Bjorn-Anderson, N. (2012). University-industry collaboration in IS research: An investigation of successful collaboration models. BLED eConference 2012 Proceedings. Paper 29. http://www.academia.edu/1855616/University-Industry_Collaboration_in_IS_Research_An_Investigation_of_Successful_Collaboration_Models
    • This paper presents the findings from an initial phase of a long-term research program to investigate successful modes of university-industry collaboration in information system (IS) research. This initial phase consisted of in-depth interviews with nine experienced IS researchers. Findings revealed that researchers have very differing individual preferences regarding the ideal set up of collaborative research projects, and these varying approaches are discussed here. Findings regarding the popularity among both researchers and industry partners of various research output formats are also presented.
  • Sitter, K. C. (2012). Participatory video: toward a method, advocacy and voice (MAV) framework. Intercultural Education, 23(6), 541-554. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14675986.2012.746842#.Uer4klO9xgY
    • This article presents a new conceptual framework of participatory visual media as method, advocacy and voice (MAV) by exploring an action research study, in which advocates from the disability community created and distributed a series of videos about love and sexuality as a critical human rights issue in the disability community. The author proposes that considering these three areas (i.e. method, advocacy, and voice) as overlapping, rather than being mutually exclusive, offers an integrated way of understanding collaborative media practices that are community-based and action-oriented. Methodological, practical and ethical considerations for collaborative research that involves public distribution are also addressed.
  • Stocker, L., Burke, G., Kennedy, D., & Wood, D. (2012). Sustainability and climate adaptation: Using Google Earth to engage stakeholders. Ecological Economics, 80, 15-24.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800912001929

    • This paper presents an action research project that developed and tested a participatory mapping methodology using Google Earth. The aim of the methodology was (1) to develop shared understandings among academics, the Rottnest Island Authority, and it’s stakeholders of the sustainability and climate change issues facing Rottnest Island, Australia; and (2) to enable these partners to collaboratively identify strategic pathways forward for the island. The strengths and challenges of the methodology are discussed.
  • Stuart, K. (2012). Narratives and activity theory as reflective tools in action research. Educational Action Research, 20(3), 439-453. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09650792.2012.697663#.Uer6SFO9xgY
    • Narratives and activity theory are useful as socially constructed data collection tools that allow a researcher to access the social, cultural and historical meanings that research participants place on events in their lives. This case study shows how these tools were used in a participatory action research project that engaged a diverse team of professionals in improving the delivery of social services for children. The narrative and activity theory tools are shown to aid insight, understanding, and action during the project
  • Taggart, D., Franks, W., Osborne, O., Collins, S. (2013). ‘We are the ones asking the questions’: The experiences of young mental health service users conducting research into stigma. Educational & Child Psychology, 30(1), 61-71. http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.stanford.edu/ehost/detail?vid=6&sid=6dfeb81e-537f-42da-a8a2bad4b2f163c3%40sessionmgr13&hid=11&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=aph&AN=85240682
    • This paper describes a qualitative study of the experiences of young mental health service users who engaged in a Participatory Action Research (PAR) project about stigma in mental health. The PAR project was comprised of eight young people using a community-based mental health service, who undertook research training and controlled all stages of the research process. The author discusses findings regarding the positive changes that occurred for the young people as a result of engaging in the research.
  • Tamminga, K., & De Ciantis, D. (2012). Resilience, conviviality, and the engaged studio. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(3), 115-151. http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/873
    • This article reports on the case of the Pittsburgh Studio, an initiative that matches students and resident stakeholders in researching local issues and identifying place-based solutions to catalyze resilience and conviviality in low-income neighborhoods. The authors trace the cooperation of the Pittsburgh Studio and the Penn State Center, describe the conceptual basis of the Pittsburgh Studio, and conclude by outlining emerging best practices for neighborhood-based engaged scholarship in the post-industrial inner city.
  • Tendulkar, S.A. et al. (2010). A funding initiative for community-based participatory research: Lessons from the Harvard Catalyst Seed Grants. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, 5(1), 35- 44.
    • In 2008 Harvard University was awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The Harvard CTSA project (also known as the Harvard Catalyst) and its Community Advisory Board (CERAB) developed a seed grant initiative to enhance community-academic research projects by providing funding directly to community partners, thus aiming to address power differentials. This article describes the goals and design of the initiative, the methods used to award seed grants, and provides a list of funded projects. Although 28 projects were successfully funded, the initiative experienced three main challenges: differences in the research readiness of communities, insufficient time to build the partnership and complete a project, and engaging academic researchers. More specifically, attracting researchers who were both interested in a community-identified research question and skilled in CBPR was difficult due to a shortage of CBPR mentors, limited funding for researchers, “the absence of protected academic time for CBPR”, and “the negative impact of pursuing CBPR on tenure prospects”. (Tendulkar et al, 42). The article concludes by emphasizing need to understand the context, capacity, and CBPR experience of the community-organization prior to funding a project, and building a more encouraging academic environment for CBPR by sharpening its definition and demonstrating its multifaceted value to both investigators and community partners.
  • Tobias, J. K., Richmond, C. A., & Luginaah, I. (2013). Community-based participatory research (CBPR) with indigenous communities: Producing respectful and reciprocal research. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, 8(2), 129-140.
    http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.1525/jer.2013.8.2.129?uid=309269831&uid=3739560&uid=2134&uid=2&uid=70&uid=3&uid=67&uid=35260&uid=62&uid=3739256&sid=21102547229747

    • In this paper the authors present a CBPR approach they have used when conducting health research with Anishinabe communities in northern Ontario. Using this case as an example, the authors demonstrate how a collaborative approach to respectful and reciprocal research can be achieved, and discuss some of the challenges they faced in adopting that approach.
  • University of California, Santa Cruz et al (2010). Engaged institutions enriching communities and strengthening families website. http://www.engagedinstitutions.org/
    • This website was created for leaders and participants of a cluster of university-community partnership projects at four state universities: the University of Texas at El Paso; the University of California at Santa Cruz; the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; and Pennsylvania State University. It provides specific information about cluster activities as well as general information and resources on university engagement.
  • Watson, D., Hollister, R., Stroud, S.E., & Babcock, E. (2011). The engaged university: International perspectives on civic engagement. International Studies in Higher Education. New York: Routledge.
    • This book is a detailed account of a global movement of higher education institutions to increase their civic engagement and social responsibility. Based on self-assessments by and authors’ visits to 20 universities (members of the Talloires Network) around the world, which are committed to directly tackling community problems, the book examines their engaged scholarship objectives, management and achievements. It provides an historical overview of each university’s founding mission, which is demonstrated as having almost invariably incorporated context-specific elements of social purpose, together with a survey of how these intentions have fared in the different systems of higher education in which they work; a contemporary account of the policy and practice of universities all over the world seeking to re-engage with social purpose; and an overview of generic issues which emerge for the engaged university. Practice comparisons are made across nations and continents, and between the global North and South.
  • Watters, A.J., Haninen, P., & Hardin, J.M. (2012). Developing a community-based research network for interdisciplinary science: The Alabama Entrepreneurial Research Network. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, 4(2). http://jces.ua.edu/developing-a-community-based-research-network-for-interdisciplinary-science-the-alabama-entrepreneurial-research-network/
    • This resource describes the Alabama Entrepreneurial Research Network (AERN), a program that equips entrepreneurs from rural low-income areas with resources and support to develop projects to improve their communities. Sustained for over 10 years and now working with 15 partners, AERN has developed into a research network for interdisciplinary work, providing community members with materials, training, counseling, and business research services through the University of Alabama. By describing the many benefits of AERN on the University of Alabama team, the entrepreneurs, and the community, this paper demonstrates how the AERN program exemplifies a sustainable university-community partnership.
  • Wood, L., & Govender, B. (2013). ‘You learn from going through the process’: The perceptions of South African school leaders about action research. Action Research, 11(2), 176-193. http://arj.sagepub.com/content/11/2/176
    • This article presents the qualitative assessment of an action research project that aimed to develop the capacity of school leaders in South Africa, which engaged ten schools and 24 school leaders. The assessment found that engagement with a systematic process of critical reflection and action facilitated epistemological and ontological shifts within participating school leaders, contributing to changed perceptions and leadership practices.
  • Woodroffe, J., Spencer, J., & Auckland, S. (2011). Community health needs assessment: A platform for promoting community-university partnerships and research to improve community health and wellbeing. Australasian Journal of University-Community Engagement, 6(2), 57-79.
    http://engagementaustralia.org.au/shared-resources/publications/journals/

    • Community health needs assessment (CHNA) is a form of community-engaged health research in which universities, local governments, and their communities partner to investigate the health and wellbeing needs and priorities of populations. This paper describes a CHNA conducted by the Tasmanian University Department of Rural Health, five Tasmanian communities, and their local governments and health services. It provides insight into how universities can be partners in inclusive community engaged research and collaboration through CHNA, and outlines the key processes and methods that inform this process.
  • Yonas, M. A., Burke, J. G. & Miller, E. (2013). VisualV: A participatory method for engaging adolescents in research and knowledge transfer. Clinical and Translational Science, 6(1), 72-77. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cts.12028/abstract
    • This paper describes the use of the Visual Voices, an arts-based participatory research method. Visual Voices involves systematic creative writing, drawing, and painting activities to yield culturally relevant information which is generated by, and examined with, adolescents. The case presented is from translational research conducted with urban middle school age youth, and is used to illustrate how Visual Voices is a particularly fitting method for translational research with younger adolescents. The authors also discuss how Visual Voices complements an Integrated Knowledge Transfer Model (IKT) for action-oriented research.
  • Zuch, M., Mathews, C., De Koker, P., Mtshizana, & Mason-Jones, A. (2013). Evaluation of a Photovoice Pilot Project for School Safety in South Africa. Children, Youth and Environments, 23(1), 180-197. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.23.1.0180
    • This field report summarizes a process of evaluation of a Photovoice pilot project, targeting school safety in a public high school in an economically disadvantaged urban community in Cape Town, South Africa. To measure the success of the project, several outcomes from Catalani and Minkler’s Photovoice impact model were used. The evaluation revealed that Photovoice can engage students to think critically about their environments, and can raise awareness of school safety issues among teachers, parents, and police officers; However, the extent to which the Photovoice project will lead to concrete long-term changes in the school remains unclear.

Campus Compact's workshops have been extremely valuable. Faculty often become energized by the workshop content and bring that enthusiasm back to campus."

-California State University-Stanislaus