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Civic Engagement at Research Universities
> Research University Engaged Scholarship Toolkit > Section C: Resources for Engaged Scholarship at Research Universities

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Section C: Resources for Engaged Scholarship at Research Universities

1. Original Essays on Engaged Scholarship Written for this Toolkit

2. Journals That Focus on Engaged Scholarship

3. National and International Resources for Promoting and/or Carrying Out Community Engaged Research in a Research University Context

4. Annotated Bibliographies

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1. Original Essays on Engaged Scholarship Written for this Toolkit

  • Cooper, D. (2009). The university in national development: The role of use-inspired research. Proposed comparative case studies of community-engaged research. dcooper-toolkitfeb09.pdf

This essay, written by a University of Cape Town professor of sociology, summarizes his community-engaged research concerns and activities, and proposes an investigation and theorization of how universities might become more deeply engaged with civil society, particularly with respect to research relations with local and regional government bodies, community and civic organizations, labor and other non-governmental organizations etc.

A brief practical essay addressing six critical areas for faculty consideration in undertaking community engaged research: institutional context, establishing legitimacy, community credibility, funding, methodological difficulties, and collaboration.

The community-engaged scholar often experiences challenges to career advancement (Commission on Community-Engaged Scholarship in the Health Professions, 2005). Fortunately, a variety of resources and tools are emerging to assist in overcoming these hurdles. This article reviews the challenges in terms of developing skills, securing recognition for community-engaged scholarly work, and particularly in successfully navigating the promotion and tenure (P and T) system. This review is followed by presentation of several resources for addressing these challenges.

Michelle McClellan, historian at the University of Michigan, received an Arts of Citizenship engaged scholarship grant for developing and teaching a public history course and for scholarship deriving from her work on a public history project. In this two-part article, McClellan describes the proposed project that was awarded Arts of Citizenship funding, then reflects on the experience — how it will affect her future teaching and future historical scholarship.

This essay profiles Loyola University’s Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL), which organizes and sponsors collaborative university-community research in the Chicago area, which emphasizes the bringing of a ‘communities eyes, ears, and voice to the research table.

This essay advocates articulation of a broader role for academic faculty in American democracy beyond their technical expertise as critical for making the case for community engaged research.

This essay focuses on the need to frame engagement as scholarship and to gain support for faculty members who do this type of work from institutional leaders.

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2. Journals That Focus on Engaged Scholarship

3. National and International Resources for Promoting and/or Carrying Out Community Engaged Research in a Research University Context

  • Action Learning and Action Research Association http://www.alara.net.au/public/home
    • Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA) is an Australian network of scholars and practitioners who use action research and action learning to promote “collaboration building, program and product delivery, and whole systems transformation.” This website can be joined to be part of discussion groups and gain access to ALARA resources and newsletters.
  • American Sociology Association (ASA). Public sociology: Project of the American Sociological Association Task Force on institutionalizing public sociologies http://pubsoc.wisc.edu/
    • The Task Force was appointed by ASA Council and commenced its work in August 2004. In addition to being responsible for designing a Public Sociology web site, the Task Force collects and analyzes information from the field on public sociology projects and public sociology promotion and tenure. The Task Force has developed and is asking the ASA Council to approve model guidelines that could potentially be adopted by interested departments as they work to promote and reward public sociology activities among their faculty. See Guidelines for Use by Academic Departments in Personnel Reviews Submitted by the Task Force on the Institutionalization of Public Sociology, for possible adoption by the ASA Council (available at: http://pubsoc.wisc.edu/pandt.html).
  • Association of Schools of Public Health (2006). Examples of academic public health practice-based promotion and tenure guidelines at accredited schools of public health, available at:http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/pdf_files/PT%20Compiled10_06.pdf
    • ASPH has compiled information from 17 schools of public health that recognize and reward academic public health practice.
  • California State University, Engaged scholarship and retention, tenure and promotion website http://www.calstate.edu/cce/resource_center/tools/scholarship_tenure_promotion.shtml
    • Provides links to three websites that provide tools for individual faculty, review committees, and institutions to reexamine the policies and procedures for recognizing service learning and other forms of community scholarship.
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research, A Guide to Researcher and Knowledge-User Collaboration in Health Research. http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/39128.html#1
    • This is an interactive, online guide based on the principles of participatory research designed to introduce researchers and “knowledge users” to the strategies of developing effective “Integrated Knowledge Translation” (IKT) research partnerships.  Modules focus on developing and sustaining partnerships and carrying out collaborative research.  They include many web-based references, which can be used with separately obtainable casebooks.
  • Campus Compact, Service-learning in promotion and tenure resources. http://www.compact.org/resources/service-learning_resources/promotion_and_tenure/
    • General list of resources related to supporting service-learning teaching and community-engaged scholarship in tenure and promotion processes.
  • Calleson D, Kauper-Brown J, Seifer S. (2005) Community-engaged scholarship toolkit, Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH). http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/toolkit.html
    • CCPH has developed an online toolkit to provide health professions faculty with a set of tools to carefully plan and document their community-engaged scholarship and produce strong portfolios for promotion and tenure. The toolkit includes sections advising faculty in preparing for promotion and/or tenure review, specific details for creating a strong portfolio, examples of successful portfolio components from community-engaged faculty and references and resources.
  • Center for Experiential Learning at Loyola University, Chicago http://www.luc.edu/experiential/engaged_scholars.shtml
    • The Center for Experiential Learning at Loyola University, Chicago gives support to faculty members who practice the scholarship of engagement. Titled “Experiential Learning”, the center’s website on the scholarship of engagement includes information on its foundations, how it differs from scholarship of discovery, additional resources for faculty on engaged scholarship, and resources on promotion, tenure, and community engaged research. From this link, colleagues can also search under “Programs” to find information regarding opportunities in community engaged scholarship.
  • Community Based Research in Canadahttp://communityresearchcanada.ca/
    • Community Based Research in Canada (CBRC) is a network of individuals and organizations practicing community-based research to “meet the needs of people and communities” (“About Us” section, CBRC website). CBRC has launched numerous projects, developed a declaration, and aims to be an open network that supports work in community-based research internationally. This website contains information about CBRC, as well as a News section providing news items and new resources. Updates on the work of similar networks, such as the Global Alliance on Community-Engaged Research (GACER), are provided.
  • Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, Developing and Sustaining Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships: A Skill-Building Curriculum http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/cbpr/index.php
    • This online curriculum is intended as a tool for community-institutional partnerships that are using or planning to use a CBPR approach to improving health.  It can be used by partnerships that are just forming as well as mature partnerships.  It contains seven multi-section units providing step-by-step advice on establishing, maintaining and sustaining partnerships.
  • Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH), Initiative on faculty for an engaged campus http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/faculty-engaged.html
    • Supported by a grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), this CCPH initiative in partnership with the University of Minnesota and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill aims to legitimize and support community-engaged career paths in the academy by developing innovative competency-based models of faculty development, facilitating peer review and dissemination of products of community-engaged scholarship, and supporting community-engaged faculty through the promotion and tenure process. The initiative builds on the work of the Community-Engaged Scholarship for Health Collaborative, a FIPSE-funded group of health professional schools that has been working to build capacity for community-engaged scholarship on their campuses and among peers nationally.
  • Higher Education Network for Community Engagement (HENCE), http://www.henceonline.org/
    • HENCE is a national network of organizations organized in response to the growing need to deepen, consolidate, and advance the literature, research, practice, policy, and advocacy for community engagement as a core element of higher education’s role in society.
  • Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life, Tenure team initiative on public scholarship: Valuing public scholarship in the cultural disciplines.http://www.imaginingamerica.org/TTI/TTI.html
    • Imagining America (IA) is a national consortium of colleges and universities committed to strengthening the public role and democratic purposes of the arts, humanities, and design. IA’s Tenure Team Initiative (TTI) seeks to develop a broad understanding of the university’s public mission and its impact on changing scholarly and creative practices in the cultural disciplines. The Tenure Team seeks to create a usable resource for deans and chairs that will help them to assess and reward public scholarship and creative work by faculty in the arts and humanities. The TTI effort arises from recent developments within the cultural disciplines themselves. These changes, it argues, are led by significant numbers of faculty who believe that public scholarship and creative work tap the most inventive potential of the arts and humanities. The TTI online Knowledge Base includes materials on core reading, civic engagement in higher education, faculty; models and case studies, research, teaching and service, tenure policies.
  • Institute for Community Engaged Scholarship, University of Guelph http://www.theresearchshop.ca/defining-our-terms#What%20is%20CE?
    • The Institute for Community Engaged Scholarship (ICES) fosters collaborative and mutually beneficial community-university research partnerships at the University of Guelph.  ICES builds capacity for community-engaged scholarship by strengthening faculty and student engagement with local, national and international communities of interest, addressing faculty reward development, and training faculty and students in knowledge mobilization.  The website contains a “Research Shop,” a resource portal to facilitate collaborative research by faculty, students and local community members.
  • International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement (IARSLCE) http://www.researchslce.org
    • IARSLCE is an international nonprofit membership organization devoted to promoting research and discussion about service-learning and community engagement. It organizes and sponsors the annual International Research Conference on Service-Learning and Community Engagement.
  • Michigan State University, The National Center for the Study of University Engagement http://ncsue.msu.edu/about.aspx
    • The National Center for the Study of University Engagement (NCSUE) seeks a greater understanding of how university engagement enhances faculty scholarship and community progress. How do scholars engage most effectively with their communities, and how, in turn, does such engagement enhance their scholarship? The Center convenes scholars and community fellows to explore ways of creating institutional support for building truly collaborative arrangements. NCSUE supports research studies and dissemination through publications, a speaker series, conferences, presentations, and workshops.
  • National Review Board for the Scholarship of Engagement. As of the toolkit’s release, this website is under construction and will be transitioning to the International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement website at http://www.researchslce.org, summer 2009.
    • The National Review Board provides external peer review and evaluation of faculty members’ scholarship of engagement. It provides consultation, training, and technical assistance to campuses that are seeking to develop or strengthen systems in support of the scholarship of engagement. It also conducts forums, programs, and regional conferences on topics related to the scholarship of engagement and provides a faculty mentoring program with opportunities for less experienced faculty to learn from the outreach experiences of more seasoned outreach scholars. The board of the International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement (IARSLCE) voted recently to assume responsibility for the Review Board, with the caveat that it might consider modifying the activities to put more emphasis on developmental reviews for faculty rather than just official reviews at the time of tenure and/or promotion. The Board agreed to expand the panel of reviewers, and to coordinate their work with that of others (such as CCPH, Imagining America and the public sociology initiative) to avoid duplication. A small working group has been appointed to develop ideas and recommendations.
  • National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, http://www.servicelearning.org/
    • The Clearinghouse offers an online library of numerous and diverse, relevant citations and resources. Suggested research terms are “tenure” and “faculty recognition.”
  • Outreach Scholars Academy (2007), Welcome to the outreach scholars academy, University of New Hampshire, http://www.unh.edu/outreach-scholars/
    • This website provides information and tools useful for establishing an engaged scholarship academy for faculty including curriculum, workshop design, principles of practice, etc.
  • The Talloires Network http://www.tufts.edu/talloiresnetwork/?pid=23&c=51
    • The Talloires Network is an international association of institutions committed to strengthening the civic roles and social responsibilities of higher education that was convened by Tufts University President Lawrence Bacow in 2005.  Its first conference gave rise to the Talloires Declaration on the Civic Roles and Social Responsibilities of Higher Education.  All signatories of the Declaration have committed their institutions to educating for social responsibility and civic engagement, and to strengthening the application of university resources to the needs of local and global communities. The Declaration “establishes the Talloires Network, with an open electronic space for the exchange of ideas and understandings and for fostering collective action.” The Network seeks to implement the recommendations of the Declaration and build a global movement of engaged universities.  The website includes numerous published sources on various aspects of engaged scholarship.
  • UCLA Center for Community Partnerships http://la.ucla.edu/ce/index.shtml
    • The UCLA Center for Community Partnerships website on civic engagement is a database of articles/books chapters/conference presentations/relevant websites divided into the following sections: Featured Articles, Featured Books, Engaged Scholarship, Scholarship Focused on Engagement, Student Learning, Institutionalizing Civic Engagement, Community-University Partnerships, Comparative Civic Engagement, and Relevant Websites and Blogs.
  • The Wellesley Institute http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/uncategorized/peer-research-in-action/
    • Based in Toronto, Canada The Wellesley Institute is a non-profit research and policy institute that develops research and community-based policy solutions to the problems of urban health and health disparities (“What We Do, Wellesley Institute website). The Institute focuses on issues in five policy fields: affordable housing; healthcare reform; immigrant health; social innovation; and economic analysis. The website contains many resources on projects in these fields, such as an updated section on news and analysis of community health issues in Toronto, research reports, 18 downloadable “flip sheets” (2-3 page documents on community equity issues), and a media room. Within the “Resources” section (http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/resources/), there is a Health Equity Toolkit, three volumes of working papers on CBPR-Peer Research and Action, and many additional entries on topics such as social determinants of health, policy impact workshops, and participatory program evaluation.

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4. Annotated Bibliographies

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