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Literacy and the English Language Learner

School: University of Texas at Brownsville
Professor: Kathy Bussert-Webb

Course Description

This course offers the student the opportunity to develop knowledge and instructional strategies for teaching reading to students of diverse cultural/linguistic backgrounds.  Special emphasis will be placed on developing oral language proficiency as a prerequisite skill to reading and on instructional strategies designed specifically to meet the needs of such learners.  Field experience is required.  Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program.

 

Required Books

Herrell, A.L. (2007). Fifty strategies for teaching English language learners ( 3rd ed.). Boston:  Pearson.

Fleischman, P. (2002). Seedfolks. NY:  HarperCollins Children’s books.

Course packet, available at the UTB Bookstore for less than $5.00. No ISBN.

You will also need a 3-ring binder and lined paper for your daily learning logs (done at the beginning and end of each class).  Last, you will need gardening gloves, and one of the following: adult size shovel, spade, pick, or hoe (with your name on it, and to be stored in the trunk of your car every day).

 

Important Notice

EDLI/EALI 4367 is a field-experience/service learning class.  This May session, you will need to meet with your tutee for 7+ hours outside of our 5-9 p.m., M-Th. class time.  (The COE field experience requirement is 15 hours, but I will count 8 of your hours when you work with your tutee for the garden project from 5-5:45, M-Th.) If you cannot meet with the tutee for 7+ hours outside of class, you will need to drop the class, as the tutoring is part of the course syllabus.  If you have a disability or injury that prevents outdoor work, you must tell me the first class session so I can make accommodations.

Please be aware that we will be planting and watering and that you will need to wear old clothes, old shoes, and conservative (not revealing) tops and shorts.  Tutoring will start when you and your tutee agree. Middle school students leave school at 2:45 p.m. and elementary students leave at 3:15. We will have our garden project from 5 to 5:45, then refreshments. Our academic part of the class will begin at 6 p.m., but class officially begins at 5. You will need to start tutoring at least by 4 p.m. to complete field experience hours and the tutoring project. Proyecto Juan Diego is only open M-Th after school.

Course Outcomes – the learner will (TLW) be able to

  1. Teach the various methods of vocabulary development, comprehension, and speaking and listening (Field Experience/Service Learning and Group Final).
  2. Relate the foundations of bilingual education and English language instruction to reading (all course assignments).
  3. Plan developmentally and culturally appropriate instruction to address individual differences among learners (Field Experience/Service Learning).
  4. Enrich literacy activities by incorporating innovative technology and multimedia activities (Strategy Presentations with ELMO and Group Presentations with Power Point).
  5. Teach questioning and communication skills as an integral part of literacy development (Field Experience/Service Learning, in-class activities, and Group Presentations).
  6. View reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing/representing as related processes (in-class activities and Field Experience/Service Learning).
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of how literacy is developed and valued in various contexts  (Field Experience/Service Learning).

College of Education Policies

Medical reimbursement:  University students will be responsible for their own transportation, meals, and health care while participating in field experience classes. University students bear the burden of any expenses incurred in conjunction with injuries that may occur during field experience classes. The university will not reimburse the student for any expenses related to injuries or illness.

Criminal record check and TB test:  When a UTB/TSC student begins to work with children for a class requirement, he/she will need a Criminal Record Check from UTB.

 

Assignments/Graded Work

1. Exam I

(250 points, exam on 5/26, Tues). The purpose of the test is for you to synthesize concepts key to bilingual education, literacy, and strategies.  Please refer to the study guide to prepare for the exam.  Concepts over the required readings will not be discussed in class, so it is the student’s responsibility to refer to the study guide for what pages and concepts will be on the exam.

2. Tutoring Recent Immigrants

(200 points, due throughout and 6/4). The purpose of Tutoring Recent Immigrants is to help you to:

  • discover the type of homework students have and where they have difficulty (when you help them with their daily homework)
  • discuss and write about the metaphor of a community walking path in relationship to service learning, 1-1 tutoring, mentoring, and teaching
  • gain experience using realia and other TESOL methods to communicate specialized vocabulary through the walking path project and tutoring (Domains I and IV of the Language Arts and Reading TExES, 8-12)
  • gain experience with diverse community resources (Domain IV, Competency 12 of the PPR)
  • design and implement instruction for ELL’s (Domains I and III of the PPR)
  • gain experience mentoring and teaching recent immigrants in diverse contexts (all domains of the PPR)
  • make decisions about strategy implementation (Domain III of the PPR)
  • gain experience and knowledge with facets of the Language Arts and Reading TExES (4-8: Domains I and II; 8-12: domains I-IV).
  • gain experience, skills, and knowledge in literacy and ELL’s for your teaching (all domains of the Language Arts and Reading TExES).

Tutees must be immigrants who have been in the USA for less than 5 years.  It is preferable that the tutoring relate to your content area and/or reading/writing. Your grade will be based on 1) following all directions, 2) demonstrated effort, and 3) verification of sessions with the contact person’s questionnaire.

Specific Assignments:

2A: Pre-reflection (legible handwriting is fine). Please complete this and turn it in the first night of class. Please answer all questions: 

  • Your major and grade level certification:
  • Your hobbies/favorite past-times:
  • Your experience with service learning SL in education (SL in education is content-related work with children for an agency/organization that services children who are low-income or who have special needs. Writing reflections of the experience and talking about the experience in class are also important in SL.)
  • Your experience teaching or working with children (teacher, parent, babysitter, Sunday school helper, day care worker, etc.)
  • Your experience with gardening (planting flowers and trees, composting, mulching, etc.)
  • What are your impressions so far of the center, the director, and the children? (What did you see and hear that gave you these impressions?)
  • What have you heard about the neighborhood?
  • What skills do you think you’ll need to tutor the student and to help with the walking path project? 
  • What do you think your tutee(s) will be like and why?
  • What do you think you’ll have in common with your tutee(s) (race, social class, gender, ethnicity, ethnic identity, immigrant experience, hobbies, etc.)?
  • How do you think you and your tutee(s) will be different (race, social class, gender, ethnicity, ethnic identity, immigrant experience, hobbies, etc.)?
  • What do you think you’ll learn from your tutee(s)? 
  • What do you think their parents will be like?
  • What anxieties or questions do you have?  (Please do not use any names or identifying information about the tutee or site. If you have turned in your consent form, this pre-reflection will be used for data analysis.)

2B. Getting to Know the Tutee (legible handwriting is fine).

Rapport Building:

a)      Briefly Introduce yourself:  Tell the tutee that you’re a teacher/ studying to be a teacher, that you go to UTB, and that the class you’re taking focuses on helping ESL students with reading and writing.  Also, it would help rapport building for you to share how many siblings you have, if you have children, etc.

b)      Tutee’s introductory information: pseudonym (fake name you both create), age, grade level, and how long respondent has been in U.S. schools.

c)      Have the tutee put in order (1-6) what s/he likes the most (1=favorite and 6= worst).

Art__

Music (listen to it, play it, or sing it)__

Math__

Dance or sports___

Language (reading, writing, speaking, or listening)__

Science__

d)     KEY! Tutee’s wish for the tutoring sessions:  What do you want more help in? Reading, writing, math, or science?  What are your greatest needs in reading (sounding out, vocabulary, comprehension, reading aloud, etc.) or writing (vocabulary, grammar, spelling, punctuation, fluency, etc.)? What aspect of math or science do you need help in?

e)      Tutee’s wish for American teachers:  “What suggestions do you have for me as a new teacher who will have ELL’s in her/his classes?”

f) Write the answers for b-e as a language experience approach.  Have the tutee read back what you wrote down.

24-Hour Writing Log, 24-Hour Math Log, or 24-Hour Science Log (depending on your content area; handout or Blackboard). The goal is for the tutees to realize they use your content area authentically (outside of school work). Give this to the tutees as an assignment to complete or go over the responses together, prompt them to write down even more examples per question.  Analysis: Analysis: On the back of the form or on a stapled piece of paper, answer these questions: How does the tutee use reading and/or writing in her/his life?  Why do you suppose this?  How did s/he respond to your ideas about how your content area is involved in everything the tutee experiences? Why do you suppose this?

Newman’s Reading Interest Inventory (handout or Blackboard). You can copy this and give it to the tutee as homework. Make 2 copies in case s/he loses the first one.  Analysis: On the back of the form or on a stapled piece of paper, summarize the tutee’s responses and write about what might be her/his biggest obstacles to reading, writing, or school (e.g., TV, too much talking on the phone, hates school, etc.)

2C. 2 Lesson Plans (30 pts. each).  The tutor must complete at least two 30-minute+ lesson plans.  Both lessons must relate to gardens, butterflies, birds, or plants in some way.  You cannot use worksheets.  Please see the student model in the course packet. Each lesson must contain:

Introduction: your name, your subject name, student’s code name, rationale (student’s most significant interests, strengths, and needs in your content area or literacy), date of lesson, and center/place where tutoring took place.

Content-area Objective (in measurable terms): TLW…. (Hint: do not use these words: learn, realize, understand, appreciate, or know; they are not measurable.)

Language Objective (developing academic reading, writing, speaking, or listening skills in L2; CALP for language in your content area in measurable terms): TLW….

Strategy:  Apply a strategy learned in our textbooks or class sessions.  If you took 4351 or 4329 with me, this cannot be a strategy we discussed/did in either class.

Evaluation:  How you’ll determine if the tutee “got it” – asking her/him questions, having her/him paraphrase, etc.  Also, you must include verification/proof that you gave the lesson (e.g., tutee’s math, writing/summary, art that accompanies the lesson, etc.).

2D (15 points each): Two Typed Process Reflections, completed two times after your different interaction with the tutee (e.g., after the intake session, after the first tutoring session, after outdoor work alongside the tutee, etc.) Please type this and email it to me and please use these headings:

1) Description:  Summarize what you did. State only facts.

2) Reaction: How did you feel and react?  What did you learn about yourself, your biases, and your assumptions?

3) Intellectual Analysis: How can you better understand #s 1 and 2 by explicitly using our course textbook and concepts? (How do your descriptions and reactions relate to 4367 specifically?) (Please do not use any real names or identifying information about the tutee or site.)

2E: Contact Person’s Questionnaire (her/his initials written in every few days you meet with the tutee (handout). You must also participate actively in our project. * 0 points will be earned if successful completion of the service cannot be verified.

2F:  Put together the entire project. When you turn in your contact questionnaire, turn in all aspects of your tutoring project (process reflection, lesson 1, process 1, etc., in order). Please use a black clip or a thin binder (no thicker than ¼ inch).

2G: Final Reflection:  to be completed at the end of the entire project. Please email this to me. Reflect on your pre-reflection, assessments, Reader Interview, lesson plans, process reflections, and the community garden project.  Please type each question # and then each answer:

  1. What have you learned from this project about teaching and learning?
  2. What have you learned from this project about service learning (SL) in education? (SL in education is content-related work with children for an agency/organization that services children who are low-income or who have special needs. Writing reflections of the experience and talking about the experience in class are also important in SL.)
  3. What have you learned from this project about this program?
  4. What have you learned from this project about the tutee/s?  (Please use code name only.)
  5. What did you find in common with your tutee(s) (race, social class, gender, ethnicity, ethnic identity, immigrant experience, etc.)?
  6. What were differences between you and the tutee(s) (race, social class, gender, ethnicity, ethnic identity, immigrant experience, etc.)?
  7. What have you learned from this project about this neighborhood?
  8. Critical theorists and those who study structural inequalities believe that school libraries need to be open in the summer and that public libraries need to have at least book-mobiles (traveling RV libraries) in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods, especially in the summer, vs. individuals giving books away. What do you think about this?
  9. What have you learned about social justice and structural inequalities?
  10. What have you learned about yourself at a personal level?
  11. Describe concrete ways you feel you impacted your tutee(s), e.g., grades in school, TAKS test, teacher’s comments, child’s change in behavior or attitudes, etc.
  12. What did the child/ren say or do during the tutoring that showed that you made a difference in their lives?
  13. What did you do or say that you feel particularly impacted the tutee/s? Why do you think these words or actions impacted them?
  14. Some say that tutoring only prepares preservice teachers for informal teaching settings, not for formal public school classrooms. Do you agree or disagree? Why?
  15. What specific service learning projects could you get your future students involved in that relate to your content area? Please see question 2 for a serv. learning explanation.
  16. What can you do to make the world a better place?

(Please do not use any names or identifying information about the tutee or site. If you have turned in your consent form, this pre-reflection will be used for data analysis.)

3. Group Presentations and Scan-tron Final

(250 points, June 3-5); this assignment correlates with all PPR standards.
Goal: Demonstrate synthesis of course material.

Directions: You will get with a partner(s) to prepare and perform a group final for the class.  Questions to choose from will be distributed later.

Grading:  Each student will be graded individually on:  presentation (65 points), group/individual evaluation (10 points), and a scan-tron test over what class members presented (175 points). You must tell me exactly what part you worked on before you present. If your presentation is such that authorship is blurred, then it is your responsibility to check group members’ work for correctness.  Correct information (content) is more important than spending inordinate time on the presentation’s appearance; 10 points will be deducted from the presentation grade for every incorrect fact.  If you don’t do your share of the work, you will receive a low grade for the presentation.

Homework

(200 points) This correlates with Domain IV of the PPR.

Preparation will be evaluated on carefully reading the assigned chapters and carefully completing the assigned homework before class. Assignments are to be turned in to the instructor before class starts.  They are your ticket into class and will not be accepted if they are turned in more than 15 minutes after class begins. No late work will be accepted. Thus, turn in what you have done the day it is due; this is better than having an entire grade affected. If something says, “Show me” on the course schedule for a particular day, the item must be complete to get full preparation credit. A family member/friend can turn in work for you if you are absent or you may turn assignments in early.  As stated in the academic honesty policy of this syllabus, you cannot collaborate on reading assignments.  I cannot accept emailed homework assignments/attachments. Each homework assignment is worth 25 points (8 assignments by 25 points each = 200 points). These assignments are: Peddling Poverty for Profit article, Seedfolks (the tiny novel by Paul Fleishman), ch’s 1-10, ch’s 11-26, My Mother Never Read to Me article, Conversations with Miguel article, ch’s 27-35, and chapters 36-50.

Participation/Attendance

(100 points). This correlates with Domain IV of the PPR.

As professionals, your attendance is required at all class sessions.  Because this class meets for only 3 weeks, you will miss experiencing important strategies and discussions if you are late or absent.  The question to ask is, “What will my future students get out of 4367 if I’m consistently late or absent?” Attendance begins at 5 and ends at 9. Attendance starts for all students on 5/18, regardless of when a student adds.  There are 12 class sessions (5/18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, and 6/1, 2, 3, 4, 5), so 8.33 X 12 = 100.

Besides attendance and punctuality, participation will be evaluated on: daily learning logs of what occurred from 3:30-6 and also what occurred from 6-9 (due at the end of each class); demonstrated preparation of readings/assignments; actively participating in small group and whole class discussions and activities; volunteering to speak on a regular basis, but not dominating; on-task behavior; listening to others completely and respectfully; and staying in class until it is over (unless a health or family emergency is explained before leaving).  Please do not assume that coming every day and on time, but rarely volunteering to speak will constitute an “A” on this component.

Methods of Evaluation/Testing

You will be evaluated on:

  • following directions, including turning in materials on time,
  • the creativity and quality of teacher-developed materials and written assignments,
  • clarity and organization of content,
  • mechanics, spelling, and usage,
  • the quality of classroom participation and presentations, and
  • demonstrating effort and thought.

These criteria are important since you will be serving as a role-model for adolescents as a classroom teacher.  Also, administrators, colleagues and parents will judge your effectiveness by your oral and written communication skills. If any written work has over six errors total in mechanics, it will receive a grade of 0 until it is corrected. The final reflection for the Tutoring Recent Immigrants project is an exception, because there won’t be enough time to revise it.

Tentative course schedule

Part of your grade is preparation.  Do what is assigned before each session.

5/18

Bring all required books and spiral notebook to class.

Activities:  Fiesta/ice breaker for tutors and tutees until 6. Do: Meet with tutee and begin completing these class assignments: Rapport Building (see syllabus), and 24-hr. Content Log and Newman’s RII (print from weekly modules, Blackboard).

Class starts at 6. Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing of logs. Complete index cards, criminal check, and phone chain. Select scribe. Introductions. Explain Field Experience and walking path project.

Possibly complete and turn in: Photo and IRB Consent form (if you desire to participate).

Complete: Pre-service Learning Reflection (“A” of tutoring project). Exam I Packet (handout). Discuss learning from disagreements and critical thinking. Overheads. Discuss syllabus. Discuss Seedfolks book assignment. Discuss artifacts for next session.  Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing of log.   Learning Logs will not be graded for mechanics, since they are free-writes or streams of consciousness. Turn in Learning Log 1 & 2 on the same side of a paper (not double sided) after class.

Learning Log 1 ( What did you learn since the moment you arrived? What was said or done that impacted you? How do you feel about this?)

When I arrived at 3:30 today, this is what happened…I feel… about …  because…

Learning Log 2: Today in class from 6-9, we did/said…  I feel … about…  because…

5/19

Bring 2 artifacts: hobby and most important thing to share with class.

Do: Meet with tutee and continue Rapport Building (syllabus), 24-hr. Content Log, and Newman’s RII (weekly modules, Blackboard).

Read: at least 50 pages of Seedfolks; write and turn in: summaries of all of the characters mentioned so far (at least 2 page handwritten total), and a 1-3 sentence connection of Seedfolks to our gardening project.

Read:  Paul Gorski’s article about Ruby Payne, “Peddling Poverty for Profit” (available under weekly modules of Blackboard; write and turn in: at least 2 pages of handwritten notes taken throughout the article (not just the beginning) and also which four ideas you think you can apply as a teacher and why from the last part of the article, “Authenticating Anti-Poverty Education.”

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m . Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing of log. Scribe.  Announcements. Discuss how to do the analyses for “B.” Discuss tutees’ strengths and needs. Discuss how to create the lesson plans for our class. Brief artifact sharing. Discuss pp. 1-50 of Seedfolks and connect the book to gardening. Discuss Ruby Payne. Discuss Gorski’s article: poverty as an individual vs. a structural issue. What do you believe? Overheads: “Oral Fluency Levels” and your own L1 development.  Estimate academic English development for L2 learners. Power Point presentation. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

5/20

Turn in:  Completed B (Rapport Building, 24-hr. Content Log, and Newman’s RII, + all of your answers to the analysis questions from the syllabus). Execute/do lesson one with your tutee.

Read: the rest of Seedfolks; Write and turn in: summaries of all of the characters mentioned so far, including the author on pp. 89-100 (at least 2 page handwritten and also write a new 1-3 sentence connection of the book to our gardening project, based on the class discussion yesterday and your understanding of the rest of the book).

Read: chapters 1-10 (pages 13-62 of Herrell and Jordan); Write and turn in: at least 7 applications/ideas you like and will use for teaching your content from the readings. Please follow this model:

Strategy 1:   Predictable Routines, pages: 15-18

Brief paraphrased description: The teacher has a set routine or schedule when things are done; she also has certain signals (bell, clapping, etc.) to let students know when it’s time to do something.

Content modifications: As an English teacher at the high school level, I would have USSR every Tues. and Thurs. I would have students’ freewriting every M, W, and F. I would have an area for each class period for students to get their writing journals; I would also have a classroom library.  For my signals, I would raise my hand and become very quiet when students are getting too rowdy. I would keep looking at them, but would be silent with my hand raised until they got the idea.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m . Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements. The first 3 weeks of a semester. Clearly delineated criteria. Slicing. Scaffolding (handout from Booth Olson). High expectations: Kati Haycock (handout).Students will discuss their favorite strategies. Strategy preparation time.  Each pair will teach class-selected strategies to the entire class. Group work on myths. Overheads: “Myths and Facts.”   Daily Learning 2.  Volunteer sharing.

5/21

Execute/do: lesson one with your tutee.

Read: Conversing with Miguel by Rubinstein-Avila, found in Blackboard under weekly modules. Write and turn in: what you learned from the article that you can apply to your future teaching (at least ½ page total).

Read: chapters 11-26 (pages 65-150 of Herrell and Jordan); Write and turn in: at least 7 applications/ideas you like and will use for teaching your content from the readings. Please follow the model:

Strategy 1:   TPR, pages: 65-68

Brief paraphrased description: The teacher calls out a command, physically models it, and the students physically do what s/he says.

Content modifications: As an English teacher who would like to teach sophomores, I would tell my students to go get their journals and copy the prompt from the board.  Next, I would walk over to where the journals for their class period are located.  I would pick up a journal, bring it to my desk, and look at the prompt on the board.  I would then act like I am writing. I would have the students physically do what I said and modeled.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m . Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements. Students will discuss their favorite strategies. Strategy preparation time.  Each pair will teach class-selected strategies to the entire class. Discuss tutoring project. Issues in speaking and listening. Overheads. Receptive language skills. Accuracy vs. fluency. L1 interference. Getting the gist.  Discuss “Conversing with Miguel” and apply concepts to Exam I.  If time: Role-plays for the “Miguel” article. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

5/25

No class. Memorial Day.

5/26

Exam I from 7:30-9 p.m.

Execute/do: lesson one with your tutee.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m. Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements. Role-plays for the “Miguel” article. Discuss how Lesson 1 went. Reflection on walking path project and the ESL concepts of realia, context imbedded instruction, leveled questions, Ruby Payne, and the course concepts you learned/read about so far.  Tie in what you’ve learned so far from the site to Test 1. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing. Review. BINGO and Catch Phrase games to synthesize concepts. Exam I from 7:30-9.

5/27

Do: Lesson 2 with tutee.

Turn in: Lesson 1, verification of lesson execution (tutee’s work).

Email me: Process Reflection 1.

Read: “My Mother Never Read to Me…” by Zulmara and Necochea, please find in UTB’s “Expanded Academic” database. Draw and turn in: a picture of your favorite part of the article and draw yourself into the scene (fly on the wall, a character, etc.). Write and turn in: on the back of the drawing, why this was your favorite scene and why you drew yourself as a certain object/character. Drawing and writing that appears to have taken less than 2 mins. to do will receive a lower grade. Stick figures are fine, as long as the drawing shows detail/effort.

Read: chapters 27-35 (pages 151-198 of Herrell and Jordan); write and turn in: at least 7 applications/ideas you like and will use for teaching your content from the readings; follow the previous models.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m. Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements. .  Students will discuss their favorite strategies. Strategy preparation time.  Each pair will teach class-selected strategies to the entire class. Issues in reading: Reading aloud: what is research based? Fluency. Comprehension. L2 testing rules in Texas.  Explore Dr. Kathy’s bilingual books and high interest, low vocabulary books. Budget tour. Discuss the article and share your art. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

5/28

Do: Lesson 2 with tutee.

Read: chapters 36-45 (pages 199-285 of Herrell and Jordan); write and turn in: at least 7 applications/ideas you like and will use for teaching your content from the readings follow the previous models.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m. Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements. Catch up. Issues in teaching vocabulary. Vocabulary strategies. Distribute group questions. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

This weekend:  meet with your group members and have your group presentation ready; email me your individual part. Each student must demonstrate they did their fair share of the cognitive and course related parts (vs. making copies and doing the technology).

6/1

Turn in: Lesson 2, verification of lesson execution (student’s work).

Email me: Process Reflection 2.

Students will discuss their favorite strategies. Strategy preparation time.  Each pair will teach class-selected strategies to the entire class.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m. Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe. Announcements.  Catch up. Issues in teaching writing. Rules in context. Finding 1-2 common errors. Mikhail Bakhtin and learning from conflicts. Role-play part of Dr. Kathy’s dissertation. Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

6/2

Read: chapters 36-50 (Herrell and Jordan); write and turn in: at least 7 applications/ideas you like and will use for teaching your content from the readings follow the previous models.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m. Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe.  Announcements. Discuss tutoring project. Students will discuss their favorite strategies. Strategy preparation time.  Each pair will teach class-selected strategies to the entire class.  Catch-up. Group flowers:  activity to synthesize and discuss the metaphors of gardening in relationship to 1-1 tutoring, mentoring, and teaching. Mikhail Bakhtin and learning from conflicts. Role-play part of Dr. Kathy’s dissertation. Focus group on these questions:

  • Can you speak about the community walking path?
  • Can you speak about the tutoring project?
  • Can you speak about having a university class taught outside of UTB walls?
  • Can you speak about service learning, which means assisting others in need in your content area and reflecting on these experiences?
  • Can you speak about what you learned about caring?
  • Can you speak about social justice and its application to this place and project?

Participants (who have signed the consent form) will participate in the focus group; only those who have agreed to participate will record themselves.  Comments from non-participants will not be transcribed.

6/3

Turn in: contact questionnaire and all aspects of your tutoring project (process reflection, lesson 1, process 1, etc., in order). Please use a black clip or a thin binder (no thicker than ¼”).

Bring: a game you could use in your content area (Yatzee, Monopoly, Battleship, Life, Catch Phrase, etc.)

Culminating Celebration activities. 4:00-5:30: Scavenger hunt, and prizes. Awards Ceremony and gift bags for tutees. Pizza and drinks, cake. Eat. Play the games you brought with tutees while you eat.

Activities: Walking path project 5-5:45 p.m . Break.  Silent moment. Daily Learning Log 1. Volunteer sharing.  Scribe.  Announcements. Course evaluations. Catch up. Students will briefly discuss their tutoring projects. Two groups will present (no Power Point Projector). Daily Learning 2. Volunteer sharing.

6/4

Email me: final reflection from tutoring project.

Group presentations.

Activities: Meet in the UTB Library. ……… Silent moment. Group presentations.

6/5 or 6/6

Fri. or Sat. — based on consensus of all students, 5 p.m.

Group presentations (if not finished).

Scan-tron final. Bring #2 pencils and scan-tron.

Mandatory attendance.

References

Booth Olson, Carol. 2006. (2nd ed.). The reading/writing  connection:  Strategies for teaching and learning in the secondary classroom. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

González, N., Moll, L., & Amanti, C. (2005). Funds of knowledge: Theorizing practice in households, communities, and classrooms. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum Associates.

Haley, M. Hall. 2004. Learner-center instruction and the theory of multiple intelligences with second language learners. Teachers College Record, 106. 163-80.

Nieto, S. & Bode, P. (2008). Affirming diversity: the sociopolitical context of multicultural education ( 5th ed.) Boston, Mass.: Allyn and Bacon.

Wilhelm, J.D. (2008).  You gotta be the book:  Teaching engaged and reflective reading

with adolescents. (2nd Ed.). NY:  Teachers College Press.

Important Websites

www.sbec.state.tx.us

This website will give you information and practice tests for the TExES tests (math, PPR, etc.).

www.tea.state.tx.us

This website contains information about Texas public schools, TAKS, TEKS, etc.

“A brain is inherited; a mind is developed.” Reuben Ferenstein

Over the past 20 years, we've seen an increase in community service and civic engagement, thanks in large part to Campus Compact."

-U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), former director of The Institute of Politics, Harvard University